Friday, January 27, 2023

2022, a year marked by storms in the Atlantic

During this season, 16 tropical cyclones formed in the Atlantic, half of which became hurricanes. Events include Alex (Storm), Bonnie (Storm), Colin (Storm), Daniel (Storm), Earl (Storm), Fiona (Storm), Gaston (Storm), Ian (Storm), Hermione (Storm), Depression Tropical Eleven Included are Tropical Depression Twelve, Julia (Hurricane), Karl (Hurricane), Lisa (Hurricane), Martin (Hurricane), and Nicole (Hurricane).

an event that can be predicted

Meteorologists are already warning that this is going to be a more active season than usual. And yes, this has been in reference to the power of the storm, which, unlike other events such as earthquakes or volcanic eruptions, can be monitored several days in advance thanks to technology.

“We see that there is no warning when an earthquake occurs, when a volcano erupts. We have a general weather forecast that gives us an idea of ​​what to expect”, meteorologist Alfredo Finley explains during an interview with voice of america,

The entire Atlantic off the east coast of the United States, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean is at risk for 6 months: June 1 through November 30. For this reason, from the National Hurricane Center, the office that serves as a reference meteorological body for the entire region, they recommend that you don’t let your guard down and don’t trust yourself.

“It’s for the whole of the Atlantic. In other words, it doesn’t mean one particular area is going to be affected, we know there are hurricanes and tropical storms every year that affect land or coastal areas,” National Hurricane Meteorologist Robert Moleda tells the center from headquarters in South Fl.

hurricanes and climate change

Many environmental activists point to climate change as the main reason for the increase in these atmospheric phenomena and call on the authorities to act immediately because, according to Diego Molina Castrillon, an environmental expert at the Cleo Institute, “It is understood that Climate change is happening. To make any other problem you face in your society worse.

Despite this, the National Hurricane Center, which has been leading the study of hurricane formation for several decades, emphasizes that there is still not enough scientific evidence to make such claims.

Ian’s Route Through Florida

Ian was the most destructive storm of the season. With winds above 245 kmph. It narrowly escaped a major storm, but it still left extensive damage and a bleak landscape. Juan Castillo was one of the survivors of the hurricane on the west coast of Florida.

“This is something we did not expect to experience and thank God we are able to tell you about it. But it is devastating. We spent practically six hours inside the eye of the storm and it was devastating.” was”, he says before visa on arrival,

There is still much work to be done, with many homes, roads and access roads completely destroyed. That’s why some migrants, the majority Latino, travel to work in the Fort Myers area on Florida’s west coast, which was devastated after Hurricane Ian about three months ago.

“We need them and they need us now, because everything is destroyed and we, as Hispanics, can be the strongest arm (manpower),” says Juan Martinez, an undocumented migrant who Wasn’t told. He thought twice going to this place and helping the affected people.

Helping Latino Immigrants

Like him, many came to the United States in search of a better life without legal work documents. Now they say that they have become the second hero of the tragedy and remember that the migrants have once again proved to be the engine of the country.

“When we go to work we don’t do it efficiently, but we go into it with a desire to move forward, as you know, when you come from our countries, you come with the American dream. , and have your American dream job”, says Jael Cruz, another undocumented migrant.

They come to this area every day without knowing whether they will get a job or not. They are placed in strategic places so that neighbors can see and rent them. Because many residents are still in need of much help to recover from the passage of powerful Hurricane Ian.

“Here it is, here people pass by, here they come and tell you I need two and you go (to work), you understand, I need three and you go from here (to work) for),” Cruz says while waiting in the vehicle for a neighbor to come rent it.

“You have to be well prepared”

Hurricane season has already ended and won’t start again until the middle of next year. Officials emphasize that the devastation left behind by these storms should, above all, serve to create awareness among the population. “Being well prepared, no matter how small a cyclone, is important,” they stress from the National Hurricane Center.

Nation World News Desk
Nation World News Deskhttps://nationworldnews.com
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