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Alcoholic beer will be pushed out by sporty alternatives, predicts Uddelaer Brewery owner

Alcoholic beer will be pushed out by sporty alternatives, predicts Uddelaer Brewery owner


Alcoholic beer will be pushed out by sporty alternatives, predicts Uddelaer Brewery owner


02 Feb 2022 — Uddelaer Sportbier, an alcohol-free white beer and sports drink released in the third quarter of last year, is shaking up the European functional F&B space. Infused with Rousselot’s bovine Peptan collagen protein, the drink is now sold in 600 Albert Heijn grocery stores and online, with hopes of developing a veganized formula.

“Uddelaer Sportbier quenches thirst, provides a fresh, energetic feeling and promotes rapid recovery of tired muscles. In short, it is the ideal replacement for soft drinks and sweet sports drinks,” owner Jacques Brinkman tells NutritionInsight.

Uddelaer also promises that it can protect connective tissue, prevent injuries and help control weight, and says the beverage contains a “high concentration” of essential amino acids involved in maintaining the body’s energy supply.

The drink reportedly has an isotonic effect and 21.4% of its energy content comes from Peptan.

Alcoholic beer will be pushed out by sporty alternatives, predicts Uddelaer Brewery ownerBrinkman says greater awareness of the benefits of functional ingredients has made advertising products like Sportbier much easier.Brinkman says the drink is not just for top athletes, but for everyone interested in boosting their physical performance.

The end of alcoholic beverages
Brinkman – a former Olympic field hockey player from the Netherlands – thinks alcohol consumption will rapidly decline over the next two decades.

“The alcohol-free market is booming. We think beer with alcohol will no longer exist over 25 years and will be entirely replaced by all sorts of alcohol-free beer,” says Brinkman.

He says that recent developments within the world of alcohol-free beer have vastly improved products’ taste, and that the alcohol-free trend will continue to spread all over the world, without exception.

“The trend is drinking less alcohol, especially within the age range of 30-45 years old.” While Brinkman says that university students aged 18-25 still drink immensely, he says that they will likely develop a healthier lifestyle as they age.

Soon enough, “drinking alcohol will be the new smoking,” according to Brinkman.

Brinkman also says the global trend towards healthier lifestyles has aided the marketing of Sportbier. “Consumers know, for example, the collagen ingredient, so in our marketing expressions, we can use itAlcoholic beer will be pushed out by sporty alternatives, predicts Uddelaer Brewery ownerThe non-alcoholic beverage category is growing worldwide. with less explanation than a few years ago.”

Created by a former Olympic gold medalist
Brinkman says he has encountered the benefits of collagen throughout his sports career.

“As a top sporter, you use a daily basis of protein after training, so I knew this ingredient for many years.”

Currently, Sportbier’s formula consists of water, malt, hops, acacia gum, herbs, aroma, yeast and bovine collagen.

“Also very important for the benefit of the consumers, besides the collagen, is what’s not in the Sportbier.” Brinkman stresses that Sportbier contains no fat, no sugars, no alcohol and no salt.

Uddelaer Brewery started in Uddel, a village in the Netherlands, as a hobby brewery. After acquiring a position on the local market, as a microbrewery, Uddelaer expanded its operations to the town of Ermelo to suit rising demand for its products.

The brewery also has a brewpub where consumers can schedule tours, tastings and overnight stays.

Uddelaer is not the only beer brewer jumping on the rising market for alcohol-free beverages. Recently, Japan-based beer giant Kirin Beverage released a report noting the rapid growth of sugar-free and alcohol-free beer and stated plans to expand its health beverage category.

By Olivia Nelson

This feature is provided by FoodIngredientsFirst‘s sister website, NutritionInsight.

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