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Thursday, December 08, 2022

Bill Madden: It’s early, but Yankees’ offense continues to haunt the bottom line

202204231034Tms Mngtrpub Sports Bill Madden Its Early But Yankees 1 Ny5

It is easy to say that there have been only two weeks of games, one of them played in unseasonably cold and pathetic conditions, after a brief spring training. The only problem with that explanation for the Yankees’ hard-to-watch, unqualified hitting is that it’s not just two weeks, but an extension of what we’ve seen over the past season.

That might all change — heck, the Red Sox hitters are off to an even worse start, their .284 OBP after 13 games being their worst since 1963 — but they’ve essentially had the same lineup of runs. Ranked third among the majors in the U.S. and OPS last year and with nearly 100 fewer strikes than the Yankees. Going into the weekend, the Yankees’ 3.0 runs per game average ranked 25th in the Majors, with their average 3.69 runners ranked 28th in the scoring position. With two outs and one runner at third base, the Yankees were 4-for-45 (.089), 26th worst according to Elias Burroughs. And he had scored more than five runs only once.

After a similar catastrophe last year, Brian Cashman opted to double down on analytics and hired not one but two analytics hitting instructors at Dillon Lawson and Casey Dykes, neither of whom have ever played in the majors. But given the composition of this Yankee team, it’s fair to ask whether Cashman’s obsession with analytics isn’t at the root of a more than a year-long malaise now.

Take Joy Gallo, who is completely lost in the plate. When the Yankees got him from Texas they knew what they were getting – a 40-homer guy who was going to strike 175 times, run 75 times and do nothing in between. It didn’t baffle the analytics folks who loved all homers up and running and could live with Strikeout. But as we all know, one thing about a player that doesn’t show up in statistics or metrics is the makeup. Whenever Jean Michel was trading or considering signing a player, his #1 criterion was always: Can this player play in New York? Gallo is a nice guy and a good fellow in the clubhouse. He just can’t play in New York.

Next is Gleber Torres, who, until last year, had always touted Cashman as his best business acquisition of all time. That, too, has been lost at the plate and has been in a steady decline since his 38-homer season in 2019. It’s clear that Torres is never going to be the player Cashman thought he was. It’s also clear that while many analytically motivated lineups can work for the Tampa Bay Rays because they have cheap platoon players in almost every situation, the same doesn’t apply to the Yankees, who don’t have that kind of players. , DJ LeMahieu and Josh Donaldson need to play second and third respectively every day, and while they’re at it, it’s time for the Yankee Brass to finally admit that Kyle Higashioka is a good hitter, not first. -String catcher and start moving forward in the job of Jose Trevino No. 1.

Cashman’s contract expires at the end of this year and Hal Steinbrenner is heavily married to her and is also involved in analytics. But if it turns out to be another season of unbearably unattainable baseball in the Bronx, when does Steinbrenner start asking: “How did I come to pay $245 million for this?”

It’s a crazy, crazy world

The Hall of Fame reorganization of the Era committees announced on Friday provides a major boost for Lou Pinella, who missed the election by one vote four years ago when his ballot last came out. Under the new reorganization, era committees were reduced from four (Today’s Game, Modern Baseball, Golden Days, Early Baseball) to two (Contemporary Baseball Era, post-1980; Classic Baseball Era, pre-1980) – with the Contemporary Era split. Will go In two separate eight-person ballots, one for the players and the other for the managers, officials and umpires. Under the old system, 10-person era committee ballots were all-inclusive—players, managers, execs, etc., all grouped into one, and all Baseball Writers’ Association ballots with Kurt Schilling, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, and Sammy Sosa. were coming out. This year, and other recent baseball writers ruled out such as Fred McGriff and Kenny Laughton are also likely to be added, a manager may not have even made the ballot this year. It was probably for this reason that Hall decided to scrap the ballots, giving qualified managers a better chance of being selected. This is good news for Pinella. The bad news is they will have to wait another year, because under the new process, the ballots will be in a three-year cycle, with only contemporary era players’ ballots for 2023, managers/executed ballots in 2024 and classic in 2025. Era Ballot (Which will include all – Players, Managers, Executioners) -. Another notable beneficiary of the reorganization would appear to be Dick Allen, who missed out on Golden by one vote in each of his final turns. Days Era ballot, but will now be on the pre-1980 Classic Era ballot as the clear standout candidate. ,

There was a lot of media furore last week over the announcement of AK icon Dave Stewart to lead a group seeking to acquire an MLB expansion team for Nashville. The only problem is that it’s never going to happen. MLB sources tell me that despite commissioner Rob Manfred’s periodic whims about expansion with 32 teams and two eight-team divisions in two 16-team leagues, there is no appetite for expansion among owners. Also, led by the Reds and Braves, Nashville is fiercely opposed to ever getting a team, expansion or not. (Sorry Stu Sternberg). Even though Nashville is beyond its territorial rights, it is still just 273 miles from Cincinnati and 250 miles from Atlanta—and that’s why the Braves and Reds have been fired in protest—and are said to have There is plenty of support from other clubs. ,

Congratulations to Steve Cohen and the Mets for naming the Citi Field press box the honoree Jay Horwitz, who will interview Bill Parcells on his podcast on April 26. In the podcast, the two-time Super Bowl-winning coach revealed that baseball was actually his first love when he was a three-sport star at River Dale High School in Oradell, NJ, but after his father refused to let him go. Later the gear shifted to football. Drop off college and accept a bonus from the Phillies.

,

202204231034Tms Mngtrpub Sports Bill Madden Its Early But Yankees 1 Ny5

It is easy to say that there have been only two weeks of games, one of them played in unseasonably cold and pathetic conditions, after a brief spring training. The only problem with that explanation for the Yankees’ hard-to-watch, unqualified hitting is that it’s not just two weeks, but an extension of what we’ve seen over the past season.

That might all change — heck, the Red Sox hitters are off to an even worse start, their .284 OBP after 13 games being their worst since 1963 — but they’ve essentially had the same lineup of runs. Ranked third among the majors in the U.S. and OPS last year and with nearly 100 fewer strikes than the Yankees. Going into the weekend, the Yankees’ 3.0 runs per game average ranked 25th in the Majors, with their average 3.69 runners ranked 28th in the scoring position. With two outs and one runner at third base, the Yankees were 4-for-45 (.089), 26th worst according to Elias Burroughs. And he had scored more than five runs only once.

After a similar catastrophe last year, Brian Cashman opted to double down on analytics and hired not one but two analytics hitting instructors at Dillon Lawson and Casey Dykes, neither of whom have ever played in the majors. But given the composition of this Yankee team, it’s fair to ask whether Cashman’s obsession with analytics isn’t at the root of a more than a year-long malaise now.

Take Joy Gallo, who is completely lost in the plate. When the Yankees got him from Texas they knew what they were getting – a 40-homer guy who was going to strike 175 times, run 75 times and do nothing in between. It didn’t baffle the analytics folks who loved all homers up and running and could live with Strikeout. But as we all know, one thing about a player that doesn’t show up in statistics or metrics is the makeup. Whenever Jean Michel was trading or considering signing a player, his #1 criterion was always: Can this player play in New York? Gallo is a nice guy and a good fellow in the clubhouse. He just can’t play in New York.

Next is Gleber Torres, who, until last year, had always touted Cashman as his best business acquisition of all time. That, too, has been lost at the plate and has been in a steady decline since his 38-homer season in 2019. It’s clear that Torres is never going to be the player Cashman thought he was. It’s also clear that while many analytically motivated lineups can work for the Tampa Bay Rays because they have cheap platoon players in almost every situation, the same doesn’t apply to the Yankees, who don’t have that kind of players. , DJ LeMahieu and Josh Donaldson need to play second and third respectively every day, and while they’re at it, it’s time for the Yankee Brass to finally admit that Kyle Higashioka is a good hitter, not first. -String catcher and start moving forward in the job of Jose Trevino No. 1.

Cashman’s contract expires at the end of this year and Hal Steinbrenner is heavily married to her and is also involved in analytics. But if it turns out to be another season of unbearably unattainable baseball in the Bronx, when does Steinbrenner start asking: “How did I come to pay $245 million for this?”

It’s a crazy, crazy world

The Hall of Fame reorganization of the Era committees announced on Friday provides a major boost for Lou Pinella, who missed the election by one vote four years ago when his ballot last came out. Under the new reorganization, era committees were reduced from four (Today’s Game, Modern Baseball, Golden Days, Early Baseball) to two (Contemporary Baseball Era, post-1980; Classic Baseball Era, pre-1980) – with the Contemporary Era split. Will go In two separate eight-person ballots, one for the players and the other for the managers, officials and umpires. Under the old system, 10-person era committee ballots were all-inclusive—players, managers, execs, etc., all grouped into one, and all Baseball Writers’ Association ballots with Kurt Schilling, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, and Sammy Sosa. were coming out. This year, and other recent baseball writers ruled out such as Fred McGriff and Kenny Laughton are also likely to be added, a manager may not have even made the ballot this year. It was probably for this reason that Hall decided to scrap the ballots, giving qualified managers a better chance of being elected. This is good news for Pinella. The bad news is they will have to wait another year, because under the new process, the ballots will be in a three-year cycle, with only contemporary era players’ ballots for 2023, managers/executed ballots in 2024 and classic in 2025. Another notable beneficiary of the reorganization would appear to be Dick Allen, who missed out on a vote in each of his final turns on Golden – the Era ballot (which would include everyone – players, managers, execs). Days Era ballot, but will now be on the pre-1980 Classic Era ballot as the clear standout candidate. ,

There was a lot of media furore last week over the announcement of AK icon Dave Stewart to lead a group seeking to acquire an MLB expansion team for Nashville. The only problem is that it’s never going to happen. MLB sources tell me that despite commissioner Rob Manfred’s periodic whims about expansion with 32 teams and two eight-team divisions in two 16-team leagues, there is no appetite for expansion among owners. Also, led by the Reds and Braves, Nashville is fiercely opposed to ever getting a team, expansion or not. (Sorry Stu Sternberg). Even though Nashville is beyond its territorial rights, it is still just 273 miles from Cincinnati and 250 miles from Atlanta—and that’s why the Braves and Reds have been fired in protest—and are said to have There is plenty of support from other clubs. ,

Congratulations to Steve Cohen and the Mets for naming the Citi Field press box the honoree Jay Horwitz, who will interview Bill Parcells on his podcast on April 26. In the podcast, the two-time Super Bowl-winning coach revealed that baseball was actually his first love when he was a three-sport star at River Dale High School in Oradell, NJ, but after his father refused to let him go. Later the gear shifted to football. Drop off college and accept a bonus from the Phillies.

,

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