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Friday, October 07, 2022

In Burkina Faso, the “militant government” is calling for growth as the prime minister resigns

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President Roch Mark Christian Cabore on Thursday called for tougher measures against the jihadist uprising in Burkina Faso, a day after the crisis fired the prime minister.

Cabore, who is seeking to quell anger over a six-year bloody campaign that has claimed the lives of nearly 2,000 people and forced 1.4 million to flee their homes, accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Christophe Joseph Marie Dabir on Wednesday.

FILE - Burkina Faso President Roch Marc Christian Cabore attends a forum in Paris, France, November 11, 2021.

FILE – Burkina Faso President Roch Marc Christian Cabore attends a forum in Paris, France, November 11, 2021.

The move also led to the resignation of the Dabire government: under Burkinabe law, the resignation of the prime minister is required, as well as the resignation of the entire Cabinet.

“A new prime minister and a fighting government must be found and as soon as possible,” the state newspaper Sidwaya demanded.

Issouf Sawadogo, a senior member of the Coalition of Civil Society Groups, said: “The country does not need a changing time, ministers only deal with day-to-day affairs.”

“We are at war and we need a belligerent government to take control of the situation,” he said, and called for the announcement of a new prime minister “within 24 hours”.

The Dabire government was “filled with a wave of protests every day that forced people to mourn the deaths of soldiers and civilians,” the online newspaper Vakat Sera reported.

FILE - The then Prime Minister of Burkina Faso, Christophe Joseph Marie Dabire, attends the first cabinet meeting of the new government at the Presidential Palace in Ouagadougou, January 24, 2019.

FILE – The then Prime Minister of Burkina Faso, Christophe Joseph Marie Dabire, attends the first cabinet meeting of the new government at the Presidential Palace in Ouagadougou, January 24, 2019.

Appointed in 2018, Dabire Al-Qaeda-linked groups and a group called Islamic State were tasked with stopping the bloodshed that began three years ago when attacks began from neighboring Mali.

But the country’s poorly equipped security forces fought a ruthless and very mobile enemy.

Protests erupted after a series of massacres this year.

Security sources told AFP that at least 13 Burkina Faso defense volunteers were killed in an attack in the north of the country on Thursday.

The peak of the deadly violence occurred on November 14 when 57 people, including 53 gendarmes, were killed in the north of the country.

Two weeks before they were attacked, the gendarmerie had warned the headquarters that they were short of food and had to be trapped to feed the animals.

According to the battle data, they waited in vain for help for several days, when they were attacked by hundreds of fighters in a pickup truck and motorcycle.

On Thursday evening, Burkina Faso and neighboring Niger troops said they had killed about 100 militants in a joint military operation against border jihadists from November 25 to December 9.

They also dismantled two bases on either side of the border, the joint statement said.

On November 27, 10 people, including a child and two journalists, were injured when police used tear gas to disperse a demonstration in the capital, Ouagadougou.

FILE - Security forces used tear gas during a demonstration in Ouagadougou, Nov. 27, 2021.

FILE – Security forces used tear gas during a demonstration in Ouagadougou, Nov. 27, 2021.

Signaling the impending changes, Kabore said it was time for a “tougher and closer team” in government.

Other voices in Burkina Faso warned against a purely militaristic approach in the fight against the insurgency.

Jacques Nanema, a professor of philosophy at the University of Ouagadougou, called for a government to fight “poverty and violence-fed poverty”.

“The fight against terrorism, the fight against hunger and poverty, the fight for inclusive development that no region should be left behind, worries not only the ruling party, but everyone as well,” the Wakat Sera newspaper wrote.

Cabore was first elected in 2015, a year after his predecessor, Blaise Compaore, who came to power in 1987, resigned as a result of mass protests over his attempts to change the constitution to stay in office.

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This article is republished from – Voa News – Read the – original article.]

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