Saturday, October 23, 2021

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

The 12th flight of the Mars Helicopter headed for the geological wonder which is the “South Sittah” region. It climbed 32.8 feet for a total of 169 seconds and flew about 1,476 feet to scout the area for later investigation by Land Rover.

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

This image, taken by NASA’s Perseverance rover on August 6, 2021, shows a hole drilled in a Martian rock in preparation for the rover’s first attempt to collect samples. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

This enhanced-color image from the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard Perseverance shows a sample tube inside the coring bit after completing the coring activity on August 6. The bronze-colored outer ring is the coring bit. The light colored inner ring is the open end of the sample tube. A portion of the tube’s serial number – 233 – can be seen on the left side of the tube wall. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

This image taken by Mars Helicopter Ingenuity during its ninth flight shows a rocky terrain in the Jezero crater region on the surface of Mars on July 5, 2021. Photo courtesy of NASA

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

This image, looking west toward the Sita geologic unit on Mars, was taken from an altitude of 33 feet (10 meters) by NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter during its sixth flight on May 22, 2021. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover used its dual-camera Mastcam-Z imager to capture this image of “Santa Cruz,” a mountain about 1.5 miles from the rover, on April 29. The full view is inside Mars’ Jezero Crater. The rim of the crater can be seen on the horizon line beyond the hill. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter captured this photo on April 19 while hovering over the surface of Mars during the first instance of powered, controlled flight to another planet. It used its navigation camera, which tracks the ground autonomously during flight. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover takes a selfie with the Ingenuity helicopter on April 6, using the Watson (Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and E-Engineering) camera located at the end of the rover’s long robotic arm. The image was constructed from 62 separate images, taken in sequence, while the rover was looking at the helicopter, then while looking at the Watson camera, stitched together after being sent back to Earth. The Curiosity rover takes a similar selfie using a camera mounted on its robotic arm. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Perseverance obtained this image of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter on April 4 using its onboard Rear Left Hazard Avoidance Camera. The helicopter will soon make its first attempt at a powered, controlled flight of an aircraft on another planet. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Perseverance acquired this image of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter on March 29 using its Sherlock Watson camera located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

A protective cover, a debris shield, was released on the bottom of the fixture to allow the Ingenuity helicopter to exit the rover on 21 March. The debris shield protects the helicopter during landing; Dropping it allows the helicopter to spin down from the rover’s belly. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Perseverance captured this image of its “ejectable belly pan” on the surface of Mars on March 14 using its onboard Left Navigation Camera. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Firmly obtained this image of its “ejectable belly pan” placed on the surface of Mars using its Sherlock Watson camera located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

A major objective of Perseverance’s mission to Mars is astronomy, which includes the search for signs of ancient microbial life. In collaboration with the European Space Agency, subsequent NASA missions will send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Persistence acquired this image on March 6 using its onboard Front Right Hazard Avoidance Camera A in the region in front of it. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Persistence took this photo on March 4 of a rocky mound in Jezero Crater, which NASA scientists said is likely the remains of an ancient river delta. Photo courtesy of NASA

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Perseverance obtained this image of the area behind it using its onboard rear Left Hazard Avoidance Camera. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Firmly suggests that there is a plate mounted on the rover’s aft crossbeam (lower right) with three fingernail-sized chips with about 11 million names of Earth. The full-resolution image was taken on February 28 by the Perseverance rover’s Left Navigation Camera (NAVCAM). The names were submitted as part of the Send Your Name to Mars campaign. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

The rover can be seen at the landing site in this enhanced HighRise color image six days after touchdown on February 24. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

The Persistence rover acquired this image using its left Mastcam-Z camera. The Mastcam-Z is a pair of cameras located high on the rover’s mast. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Persistence documents the surface of Mars. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

The surface of Mars has been documented in strongly detail. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Navigation cameras aboard the Mars rover captured this view of the rover’s deck on Monday. This view provides a look at PIXL (Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry), one of the instruments mounted on the rover’s archived arm. Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

This panorama, created by the navigation cameras aboard the Persistence, was stitched together from six separate images after they were sent back to Earth. Subsequent missions, currently under consideration by NASA in collaboration with the European Space Agency, will send spacecraft to Mars to collect these cached samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis. Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

This is the first high-resolution, color image that will be sent back by the Hazard Camera (HazzCam) after NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover landed on February 18. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

This high-resolution still image, from a camera aboard the descent stage, is part of a video taken by multiple cameras as NASA’s Perseverance rover touched down on Mars. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

In this image taken Thursday by the High-Resolution Imaging Experiment camera aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Perseverance can be seen falling through the Martian atmosphere in the descending phase, its parachute trailing. The ancient river delta, the target of the Perseverance mission, can be seen entering Jezero Crater from the left. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

One illustration depicts the rover driving in the foreground over the grounds of Jezero Crater, where the Robot Explorer landed safely. Image courtesy of NASA

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

An image showing the Perseverance Mars rover has landed during the NASA Perseverance Rover mission post-landing update on February 18 at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

Members of NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover team look at mission control as the first images arrive after the spacecraft successfully touched down on Mars. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

The first pictures taken by NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover after landing on the surface of Mars. A major objective of Perseverance’s mission to Mars is astronomy, which includes the search for signs of ancient microbial life. Photo courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

These computer simulations show Perseverance descending on the Martian surface. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, paving the way for human exploration of the Red Planet and will be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith. Image courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

In this example of its landing on Mars, the spacecraft carrying NASA’s Perseverance rover is slowed by using the drag generated by its motion in the Martian atmosphere. Hundreds of critical events must be timed for a rover to land safely on Mars. Entry, descent, and landing, or “EDL”, begins when the spacecraft reaches the top of the Martian atmosphere, traveling at approximately 12,500 mph. The cruise phase separates about 10 minutes before entering the atmosphere, leaving the aeroshell, which encloses the rover and the descending phase, to travel to the surface. Image courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

An illustration of Perseverance on Mars launched from Earth in July. It is the fifth rover to successfully reach Mars, and the first of three that can return rock samples to Earth. Image courtesy of NASA | license photo

NASA plans careful restart for Mars helicopter after quiet period

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