Monday, October 18, 2021

Need to reach agreement on virus deaths: Lieutenant Governor of Queensland

The Deputy Prime Minister of Queensland said that the National Cabinet must make a “challenging decision” on how many COVID-19 deaths they are willing to accept in order for Australia to reopen.

Lieutenant Governor Steven Miles stated that the vaccination rate is not the only variable that the prime minister and state and territory leaders need to consider before reopening under the national plan.

He said that the Dougherty Institute only modeled the number of cases, hospitalizations, ICU cases, and deaths that occurred under varying levels of vaccination coverage and testing, tracking, isolation, and quarantine measures.

The deputy prime minister said that the national cabinet has not yet reached an agreement on the number of deaths that leaders are willing to accept in order to relax restrictions and soften national border controls.

“Well, this is actually a decision that needs to be made here,” Mr. Miles told ABC Radio on Friday.

“The model calculates how many people die in each case. This is a challenging decision our leaders need to make. I don’t think they can simplify it like the prime minister tried.”

Mr. Miles said Queensland cannot promise to reopen until the National Cabinet makes a clear decision because other state leaders may be willing to accept more cases, hospitalizations, ICU cases and deaths.

He said that reopening or not reopening is not a binary choice. He said that the model shows that some degree of restriction, such as lockdown, may be needed to deal with the outbreak.

The Deputy Prime Minister said that with a vaccination coverage rate of 80%, the possibility of blockade is less, but the decision on the border will depend on the situation in other states.

He also defended Queensland’s vaccination coverage rate, which was 51.6% and 32.9%, which was the second lowest in the country.

Mr. Myers said that due to the outbreak, New South Wales has obtained more Pfizer vaccines. He denied that the Queensland government had blocked its launch by causing “panic” about the blood clot produced by AstraZeneca injection.

“This is health advice, people can check, check and make their own decisions,” the deputy prime minister said.

“You know, just this week, there were complications related to the vaccine, but we will continue to launch the vaccine as soon as possible.”

Mr. Myers countered the comments of the Federal Minister of Health Greg Hunter that Queensland’s hard border policy was a “serious moral failure” that would shut out patients and toddler Memphis Francis.

He said that as long as there was an application, the three-year-old was exempted, and Mr. Hunter himself failed.

“The Federal Minister of Health called this the’biggest moral failure’ and it is incredible that thousands of people in New South Wales at his door have contracted this virus.” The Deputy Prime Minister of Queensland said, The National Cabinet must make a “challenging decision” on how many COVID-19 deaths they are willing to accept in order for Australia to reopen.

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Steven Miles stated that the vaccination rate is not the only variable that the prime minister and state and territory leaders need to consider before reopening in accordance with the national plan.

He said that the Dougherty Institute only modeled the number of cases, hospitalizations, ICU cases, and deaths that occurred under varying levels of vaccination coverage and testing, tracking, isolation, and quarantine measures.

The deputy prime minister said that the national cabinet has not yet reached an agreement on the number of deaths that leaders are willing to accept in order to relax restrictions and soften national border controls.

“Well, this is actually a decision that needs to be made here,” Mr. Miles told ABC Radio on Friday.

“The model calculates how many people die in each case. This is a challenging decision our leaders need to make. I don’t think they can simplify it like the prime minister tried.”

Mr. Miles said Queensland cannot promise to reopen until the National Cabinet makes a clear decision because other state leaders may be willing to accept more cases, hospitalizations, ICU cases and deaths.

He said that reopening or not reopening is not a binary choice. He said that the model shows that some degree of restriction, such as lockdown, may be needed to deal with the outbreak.

The Deputy Prime Minister said that with a vaccination coverage rate of 80%, the possibility of blockade is less, but the decision on the border will depend on the situation in other states.

He also defended Queensland’s vaccination coverage rate, which was 51.6% and 32.9%, which was the second lowest in the country.

Mr. Myers said that due to the outbreak, New South Wales has obtained more Pfizer vaccines. He denied that the Queensland government had blocked its launch by causing “panic” about the blood clot produced by AstraZeneca injection.

“This is health advice, people can check, check and make their own decisions,” the deputy prime minister said.

“You know, just this week, there were complications related to the vaccine, but we will continue to launch the vaccine as soon as possible.”

Mr. Myers countered the comments of the Federal Minister of Health Greg Hunter that Queensland’s hard border policy was a “serious moral failure” that would shut out patients and toddler Memphis Francis.

He said that as long as there was an application, the three-year-old was exempted, and Mr. Hunter himself failed.

“The Federal Minister of Health called this the’biggest moral failure’ and it is incredible that thousands of people in New South Wales at his door have contracted this virus.”

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This News Originally From – The Epoch Times

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