Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Study Shows COVID-19 Pandemic Has Reduced Life Expectancy Globally In 2020

Last year, the COVID-19 pandemic led to a reduction in life expectancy worldwide, according to a new international study.

A team of researchers led by Nazur Islam, professor of public health at the University of Oxford, examined changes in life expectancy in 37 upper-middle- and high-income countries, using the years between 2005 and 2019 as a benchmark, and compared the age of those who died with age. their life expectancy.

A study published this week in the scientific journal BMJ found that the biggest drop in life expectancy is seen in Russia, with men losing 2.33 years and women losing 2.14 years. In second place was the United States, where men lost 2.27 years and women lost 1.61 years, followed by Bulgaria, where men lost 1.96 years and women lost 1.37 years.

Read Also:  Fed Chairman Jerome Powell tells Congress inflation 'likely to remain high over the next few months'

Life expectancy has dropped in 31 countries. Researchers estimate that the population of these countries has lost about 28 million additional life years.

Doctors treat a patient with coronavirus in the intensive care unit of the Regional Clinical Hospital No. 1 in Krasnodar, southern Russia, November 2, 2021.

Six countries – Denmark, Iceland, New Zealand, Norway, South Korea and Taiwan – were the only countries surveyed where life expectancy either increased or remained the same.

The researchers say that most countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America were excluded from the study due to lack of data, meaning that the real losses from the pandemic were likely even higher.

According to the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, the pandemic has claimed more than 5 million lives since the first cases were discovered in central China in late 2019, with the United States leading the world in COVID-19 deaths at 750,430.

Meanwhile, vaccinations for children ages 5-11 began in earnest in the United States on Wednesday, just hours after Dr. Rochelle Walensky, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, formally accepted the advice of the agency’s vaccine advisory group. that the low dosage of Pfizer’s dual vaccine vaccine is safe for this age group.

Jeff Zientes, White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator, told reporters on Monday that the government has already begun shipping doses to more than 20,000 doctors’ offices, pharmacies and various clinics across the country to begin vaccinating 28 million children. Zienz said the program should be “fully operational” by next week.

In Beijing, more than 1 million people have applied to compete for the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing, according to the state-run Global Times, which is quoted by Atlanta-based cable news network CNN. Enthusiasm for the Games, which is slated for February, is on the rise despite ongoing COVID-19 outbreaks in China, prompting authorities to introduce a “COVID zero” policy that includes large-scale testing and stringent restrictions to contain the spread. virus.

The organizers of the Beijing Winter Olympics will host the Games in a “COVID-proof bubble,” in which athletes and other participants will be isolated from local residents. In addition, only mainland Chinese residents will be allowed to participate in the Games as spectators.

Nation World News Deskhttps://nationworldnews.com
Nation World News is the fastest emerging news website covering all the latest news, world’s top stories, science news entertainment sports cricket’s latest discoveries, new technology gadgets, politics news, and more.
Latest news
Related news
- Advertisement -