Tabulating the long-term impact of COVID



Throughout his career devoted to health research, Dr. Alan Katz had never seen anything like it.

In the fall of 2021, it was announced that the Manitoba Center for Health Policy (which Katz leads) had been awarded a grant to study a “prolonged COVID-19” study in people who have contracted and survived was the name given to the prolonged suffering experienced by coronavirus.

Shortly after the news broke, Katz said something extraordinary happened: He began getting direct calls from people who believed they were suffering from chronic COVID, and who wanted to take part in the study.

Tabulating the long-term impact of COVIDMike Sudoma / Winnipeg Free Press Files

Dr. Alan Katz and his team have been working urgently to analyze years of anonymized data in the Manitoba health-care system.” width=”2048″ height=”1363″ srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress. com/images/400*400/NEP159314_web_DrAlanKatz_MikeSudoma_October27_2021-3.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600/NEP159314_web_DrAlanKatz_MikeSudoma_October27.w,https://free. 700*700/NEP159314_web_DrAlanKatz_MikeSudoma_October27_2021-3.jpg 700w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/800*800/NEP159314_web_DrAlanKatz_MikeSudoma_Octoberpress27_2021-3.jpg 800w. NEP159314_web_DrAlanKatz_MikeSudoma_October27_2021-3.jpg 900w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/1000*1000/NEP159314_web_DrAlanKatz_MikeSudoma_October27_2021-3.jpg 1000w”/>

Mike Sudoma / Winnipeg Free Press Files

Dr. Alan Katz and his team are working urgently to analyze years of anonymized data in the Manitoba health care system.

“I’ve researched for a long time and I’ve never seen anything like this before,” he said.

Katz informed callers that her research does not rely on data from a small control group of COVID-19 survivors. He and his team are working urgently to analyze years of anonymized data in the Manitoba health care system.

In other words, anonymous health data is used on virtually everyone who has long accessed the health care system to discover the impact of COVID.

Tabulating the long-term impact of COVIDTessa Vanderhart / Winnipeg Free Press

In terms of medical history, Dr. Katz has access to details of underlying health conditions, diagnosis, disease treatment (including surgical intervention) and pharmaceutical history.” width=”720″ height=”1023″ srcset=”https:// media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*400/NEP159314_web_mchp_250_180919.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600/NEP159314_web_mchp_250_180919.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/ 700*700/NEP159314_web_mchp_250_180919.jpg 700w”/>

Tessa Vanderhart / Winnipeg Free Press

In terms of medical history, Dr. Katz has access to details of underlying health conditions, diagnosis, disease treatment (including surgical intervention) and medication history.

The data includes basic demographic information: the first three letters of the postal code of age, gender and home residence. In terms of medical history, Katz has access to details of underlying health conditions, diagnosis, disease treatment (including surgical intervention), and pharmaceutical history.

Put all the data together, and run it through an algorithm designed to flag markers of patients contracting COVID-19, and Katz hopes to come up with a clearer picture of how many people suffer from chronic COVID-19, their symptoms. How severe are, and perhaps, how long the syndrome can be expected to last.

“Getting population data on how many people have been affected will help us determine future demands on the health care system,” Katz said in an interview.

“Obtaining population data on how many people have been affected will help us determine future demands on the health-care system.” – Dr. Alan Katzo

Despite the lack of profile in the general public, the idea of ​​COVID-19 causing serious, long-term health effects is not exactly in dispute between the front lines of the pandemic and those working in scientific research related to the pandemic.

Researchers have already established many COVID-19 survivors – including healthy people with no apparent underlying health concerns – continue to suffer from a wide range of symptoms long after the virus is gone. Keep it

There are people who suffer from shortness of breath (shortness of breath). Some suffer from loss of smell. Others have experienced a decline in cognitive function or have reported heart problems.

And researchers believe there is a large but undefined population that suffers from chronic fatigue syndrome, a mysterious condition with no known cause or treatment.

How many people suffer from chronic COVID, and how long do their symptoms last? This is, in part, what Katz and his team are trying to determine with an unprecedented deep dive into Manitoba health data.

How will the world respond to all the backlog created by the pandemic, if at the same time, it is trying to treat new groups of people with serious and long-term health problems?

It is impossible to overestimate the impact of this research’s findings on the political and public health debate on COVID-19 and future pandemics.

In the current battle over social and economic restrictions, the issue of long-term COVID remains largely in the shadows, from the perspective of protesting truck drivers, stubborn anti-vaxxers and skittish politicians. Mostly as a result of pandemic fatigue, these factions have already decided that it is possible to “live with the virus” without any serious, long-term consequences.

Tabulating the long-term impact of COVIDChris Young / The Canadian Press Files

The pandemic has brought parts of the health care system – particularly elective surgeries and diagnostic procedures – to their knees.” width=”1024″ height=”683″ srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress” .com/images/400*400/NEP159314_web_Sarnia-Hospital-20220202.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600/NEP159314_web_Sarnia-Hospital-20220202.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress .com/images/700*700/NEP159314_web_Sarnia-Hospital-20220202.jpg 700w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/800*800/NEP159314_web_Sarnia-Hospital-20220202.jpg 800w,https://media.winnipegfreepress .com/images/900*900/NEP159314_web_Sarnia-Hospital-20220202.jpg 900w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/1000*1000/NEP159314_web_Sarnia-Hospital-20220202.jpg 1000w”/>

Chris Young / Canadian Press Files

The pandemic has brought parts of the health care system – priority elective surgery and diagnostic procedures in particular – to its knees.

Irrefutable scientific data showing the magnitude and severity of chronic symptoms will turn that claim on its head, and redefine what we mean by “learning to live with the virus.”

This could completely quell the debate around health care funding and reform.

The pandemic has brought parts of the health care system – priority elective surgery and diagnostic procedures in particular – to its knees. Right now the system configured and funded cannot keep up with the huge number of seriously ill COVID-19 victims.

How will the system respond to all the backlog created by the pandemic in the world, as it tries to treat new groups of people with serious and long-term health problems?

How many people suffer from chronic COVID, and how long do their symptoms last? This is, in part, what Katz and his team are trying to determine with an unprecedented deep dive into Manitoba health data.

The terrible truth is that we will never have a system that can do it all.

So, before we start easing social and economic restrictions or mask mandates, we need to know what a big problem we are facing. We won’t know that until we have better control over the long-term effects.

It is important to note that scientific fiction has always emphasized that COVID-19 is nothing like seasonal influenza. Further, there is no evidence that it will become less toxic as it mutates. While it is possible, it is certainly not possible yet.

The current pandemic may subside in the near future. But we won’t know whether we can actually live with the virus until we find out how long the consequences of this virus will last in all of us.

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Dan Lay

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