Wednesday, September 28, 2022

What is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder?

PMDD can cause depression, anxiety, and other physical and mental symptoms in the two weeks before your period (also known as a period) starts.

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Photo: Shutterstock

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (SPM). PMDD can cause depression, anxiety, and other physical and mental symptoms in the two weeks before your period (also known as a period) starts. These symptoms can be so intense that they prevent you from doing activities of your daily living, such as working, studying, or socializing. Symptoms of PMDD usually go away after your period starts, or a day or two later.

What causes premenstrual dysphoric disorder?

It is not yet known exactly what causes premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). However, the scientific community believes it has to do with the hormonal changes that happen during your period and a chemical in your brain that affects your mood called serotonin.

What are the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder?

Most people who menstruate have symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), such as cramps, bloating, breast tenderness, or mood changes before or during your period. Most of the time, all it takes is a little self-care to ease its symptoms. premenstrual syndrome, However, in the case of PMDD, the symptoms are much worse and cause major problems in your daily life. If you have any of the following symptoms and they are persistent for a week or two before your period starts (or at which time they get worse), talk to your doctor or nurse about PMDD.

Symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder include:

  • depression
  • nervousness or anxiety
  • panic attacks
  • feeling very tired
  • not being able to sleep
  • difficulty staying focused
  • breast tenderness
  • headache
  • colic
  • joint pain
  • swelling
  • craving for certain foods

How is premenstrual dysphoric disorder treated?

If you think you have PMDD, your doctor or nurse may ask you to monitor your menstrual symptoms for a few months. In addition, you may have blood tests or other tests to rule out other problems that may be causing your symptoms. He may also ask you questions about whether you have ever had anxiety or depression.

There is no cure or medicine that works for all people with PMDD. Your doctor or nurse will talk to you about your options, which may include:

  • Antidepressants are called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).
  • hormonal contraception
  • over-the-counter pain medications such as ibuprofen or aspirin
  • changes to your diet and regular exercise
  • stress management tools (such as meditation and other forms of self-care)

If you are having difficulty managing emotional symptoms such as depression or anxiety, it is a good idea to seek help from a mental health professional right away. You can get help at SAMHSA in your area or contact a counselor, your health insurance company, a doctor or nurse. It may also be helpful to talk to a close friend or family member about how you are feeling.

If you are thinking of hurting yourself:

  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (1-800-273-8255)
  • go to the emergency room
  • call 911

PMDD can be overwhelming, but you won’t have to deal with it without help and support. Enlisting the help of a specialist, whether it’s a counselor or a therapist, is a good start. Plus, going to a doctor or nurse to help you manage your symptoms can make it easier.

Fuente: Planned Parenthood

Nation World News Desk
Nation World News Deskhttps://nationworldnews.com
Nation World News is the fastest emerging news website covering all the latest news, world’s top stories, science news entertainment sports cricket’s latest discoveries, new technology gadgets, politics news, and more.
Latest news
Related news
- Advertisement -